Sunday, August 19

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Leadership at All Levels in AFS 

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This workshop is designed for new and emerging leaders in AFS. It addresses the need for new and emerging leaders to better understand how AFS functions, the roles of Unit leaders in AFS, and how to be an effective leader in an all volunteer organizations such as AFS.

Registration is free, but attendees are asked to sign up in advance.

Instructors: Steve McMullin, AFS President
Jesse Trushenski, AFS President-Elect
Scott Bonar, AFS 1st Vice President
Brian Murphy, AFS 2nd Vice President
John Boreman, AFS Constitutional Consultant

Steve McMullin

Scott Bonar

Jesse Trushenski

Brian Murphy


8:30 am – 4:30 pm

A Life Cycle of Scientific Communication: Presenting, Writing, Reviewing, and Using Social Media for a Variety of Audiences

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Graduate students and young professionals face a steep learning curve in scientific communication.  Whether it’s an academic seminar, publishing in a scientific journal, reviewing a grant proposal, or reaching stakeholders over social media – each audience can have high expectations of you as the subject matter expert.  This workshop is designed to help you with sci comm whether you are starting your first research project, finishing up your second post-doc, or just getting your feet wet in the natural resources workforce. Topics that will be covered are: 1) designing an effective presentation; 2) strategic approaches to writing (and reading!) your next manuscript in a peer-review journal; 3) engaging in the peer-review process; 4) harnessing the power of social media; and 5) crafting key scientific findings in understandable and concise ways. The format will be a series of lectures interspersed with open discussions facilitated by the speakers. A ‘meet the editors’ session will put a face on the diversity and depth of journals published by the American Fisheries Society.

Registration fee: $25

Instructors:
Aaron Bunch, Virginia Department Game of Inland Fisheries
Patrick Cooney, Smith-Root
Richard McBride, NOAA

Rich McBride

Aaron Bunch

Patrick Cooney


9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Impact-a-thon: Angling for New Ideas in Science Communication

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A peer-reviewed publication is a key element of the scientific process, but what can be done to increase the impact of published work, especially beyond the world of fisheries professionals?

To improve public, stakeholder, and decision-maker engagement with scientific information, Wiley’s Research division wants to explore new ways to further the impact of fisheries science.  The workshop will begin by exploring the specific methods used to translate scientific language for both science and non-science groups, and how best to tailor a message for specific audiences.  We will look at both the written and visual components that can be used to increase the impact of scientific messaging.  The second part of the workshop will be all about getting creative. For this part, teams will be formed to brainstorm ideas and design projects that could improve the communication of fisheries science, focusing on reach, understanding, inspiration, etc. For example, participants might propose a project that examines the effectiveness of different communication styles between academics and anglers regarding marine protected areas.  Throughout the event, teams will be challenged and supported by workshop leaders. The workshop will end with presentations by each team on their ideas and project design.  A panel of judges (editors, society leaders, science communicators) will provide feedback and select the proposal that has the most potential for increasing the impact of fisheries science.  The winning proposal will be awarded a grant from Wiley Publishing to put their ideas into action.

Impact-a-thon Objectives

The objectives of an Impact-a-thon hosted in partnership with Wiley Publishing and the AFS Science Communication Section will be to:

  • Accelerate the implementation of fisheries science from published research
  • Inspire and engage the next generation of fisheries scientists
  • Expand the awareness of key topics in the area of aquatic ecosystems, conservation and sustainable fisheries

Registration fee: $25

Instructors:
Patrick Shirey, Ecology Policy, LLC
Julie Claussen, Fisheries Conservation Foundation
Ben Shouse, Pew Charitable Trusts
Solomon David, Nicholls State University

Wiley Publishing Research Division Team:
Samantha Green
Anna Hofvander
Kathryn Chaloux
Steven Ottogalli

Patrick Shirey

Julie Claussen

Ben Shouse

Solomon David


 12:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Monsters of Climate Science

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The 1980s “Monsters of Rock” tour brought together the best heavy metal bands in the world to play together. The Monsters of Climate Science workshop will bring together top scientists from around the country for an afternoon of mayhem, mirth, and majorly informative presentations on different aspects of climate change and the impacts on fisheries.  This event, which is organized by the AFS Estuaries and Marine Fisheries Sections, will benefit student travel awards for the AFS Annual Meeting.  Laser lights, heavy metal, great talks, and a great cause–what’s not to like?

  • Students: $20
  • All other attendees: $40

Monsters:
Doug Beard, U.S. Geological Survey (opening remarks)
Lisa Kerr, Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Abigail Lynch, U.S. Geological Survey
Vince Saba, NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Michelle Staudinger, U.S. Geological Survey
Talia Young, Princeton University

Doug Beard

Lisa Kerr

Michelle Staudinger

Abigail Lynch

Vince Saba

Talia Young


 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Uncomfortable Conversations: Safety and Security in the Fisheries Field

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Promoting “ethnic, socio-economic, generational, and disciplinary diversity” within AFS is identified as a key strategy in the 2015–2019 AFS work plan. As the world’s oldest and largest fisheries organization, AFS has struggled with diversity and inclusion among its membership and is actively seeking ways to improve the “disciplinary, gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity” of its membership. As a first step, it is crucial to recognize and understand why this lack of diversity among the AFS membership exists in the first place. The Equal Opportunities Section of AFS is providing a workshop to identify, understand, and create tools to address unintentional bias within AFS and the fisheries profession at large. Unintentional bias can be defined as the “unconscious mental models we all have about social groups (i.e., favorable or unfavorable attitudes or stereotypes) that affect our unconscious assessment of others.” Understandably, tackling issues related to gender, race, age, culture, and sexual orientation can be uncomfortable conversations to navigate and tend to be avoided. However, for AFS to meaningfully address this issue, these are the uncomfortable conversations that we need to have.

Registration fee: $15

Instructor: Dave Barak, Student Conservation Association

Dave Barak